A Guest Post by Raphael Rogers & Kristin Gerhart

We never intended to shoot a documentary film about climate change prior to our trip. We flew to Anchorage, Alaska this past November on a whim with our camera gear in tow. Our plan was that we had none, no set itinerary, just the goal to experience what Alaska had to offer and document the adventure along the way. That being said – as filmmakers we’re always prepared to tell a story. This particular story, however, turned out to be far more gripping than any of us could have imagined.

GLACIER EXIT from Raphael Rogers on Vimeo.

We arrived at Exit Glacier on the second day of our trip but the gate was closed. Alone on a rain soaked road and barred from entry, we were about to give up our chance to see this natural wonder.  The steady sound of an old van’s engine chugging through the cold stopped us and that was the moment we serendipitously met Rick Brown, a local glacier guide. We paid a small fee to enter the park and he gave us a ride down to the glacier trail, stopping along the way so we could witness the mile markers which showcased how far the glacier had receded over the past two centuries. It was an eye-opening moment witnessing how much the melting has accelerated in recent years. As we hiked above the vast chasms of ice, we could hear water flowing as it poured out from the glacier into the stream that eventually wound its way to the ocean.

After hearing Rick’s words and watching the glacier melt before our eyes, we immediately asked Rick if we could tell his story and went to his shop the next day to interview him.

This film took two days to shoot: the first day at Exit Glacier and the second day at Rick’s shop, Adventure Sixty North. After our trip, our editor was so inspired by the footage that she stayed up until 2 AM every night to piece the story together.

We are hoping this is the first of many. Real stories, real people. Education, inspiration. Lets take care of our planet.

For more information on who we are, check out our website.

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