Naresh Ramchandani, cofounder of Do The Green Thing, during presentación at the What Design Can Do event, held in São Paulo, Brazil, last September.

Exactly 10 years ago, a collective of communication and design professionals was founded in England, who uses creativity to face the current environmental dilemmas and bring easy and attractive solutions for all audiences. Over the last decade, ‘Do The Green Thing’ has inspired more than 45 million people in 202 countries to live a more sustainable life, and now it comes to Brazil in a partnership with 350.org in a move to be part of the global climate movement.

“We are bombarded daily by advertisements of products and companies that only harm the environment, climate and life, but try to make us believe the opposite. In addition, the speed of everyday life demands more and more easy solutions that close to people’s hands. 350.org admires and supports the work of The Green Thing, and is very happy to be one of their partners in Brazil,” says Nicole Oliveira, director of 350.org Brazil and Latin America.

The Green Thing is a collective of communication and design professionals was founded ten years ago in England, who uses creativity to face the current environmental dilemmas and bring easy and attractive solutions for all audiences. Over the last decade, ‘Do The Green Thing’ has inspired more than 45 million people in 202 countries to live a more sustainable life, and now it comes to Brazil in a partnership with 350.org.

The organization involves a global community of creative to produce films, posters, podcasts and products that highlight the importance of acquiring greater awareness of the planet’s health in the most basic and everyday acts. Advertising pieces created by the collective challenge issues such as pollution, transportation, global warming, excessive consumption, waste disposal in cities, and anything that is unsustainable in the current status quo.

“We put the industries, institutions and traditions that are most harmful to our lives in the public eye, and offer creative solutions in return, bringing to the forefront the need for another model of economic development for the world. Learning to deal with the complexity of modern life, thinking about ecological alternatives that are balanced with the environment is our biggest challenge,” says Naresh Ramchandani, co-founder of The Green Thing.

Do The Green Thing invites people to look at life differently – whether in culture, behavior or politics. According to Naresh, the project’s ultimate goal is to make sustainable choices as desirable as unsustainable, and this is done through creative and visually appealing pieces and campaigns, produced with rigorous research and original arguments.

“Climate change is an ever closer reality, so we need to roll up our sleeves and do more in this area as well. The partnership with 350.org comes at a good time as we are looking to broaden our horizons and be part of this global climate movement. Our values ​​are aligned and we also find it fundamental to empower and mobilize people from the local levels to bring real changes in behavior and thus pressure governments and companies to do their part as well,” says the creative.

Nicole and Naresh: partnership with 350.org brings Do The Green Thing to Brazil.

The first project of the partnership is called “Ungifted“. Playing with the time of the year when people around the world shop for Christmas gifts for family and friends, the project encourages citizens to provide interesting experiences that will be kept in the memory, rather than giving objects that soon will be forgotten, replaced or simply thrown away. It could be a show, a home-cooked meal, a chess lesson or anything else that would help save the planet and people from another waste.

UNGIFTED

For Nicole Oliveira, interesting and innovative initiatives that promote sustainable solutions for diverse audiences “out of the bubble” are always welcome in a world dominated by the consumption and disposal industry.

“Any initiative that brings to society the consciousness of caring for our environment and the future generations is very opportune. We are not here at this planet just passing by. We must take care of it so that others who come after us can enjoy it healthy. We have the duty to return it just as we found it: with its strong and fundamental natural resources, which are our greatest wealth on this earth.”

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