Stop the Energy East Pipeline

The Biggest Pipeline Yet.No_Energy_East_Robin_Tress

TransCanada’s Energy East project is the largest tar sands pipeline proposed yet. Stretching from Alberta to New Brunswick, Energy East could carry over 1 million barrels per day of tar sands crude to the Atlantic coast. Despite TransCanada’s promises that Energy East is for domestic gain, they are making plans to export the vast majority and leave us to bear the real costs of climate change, spills and clean-up.

Fighting Energy East is crucial in stopping renegade tar sands expansion that is violating Indigenous rights, threatening frontline communities along the pipeline route and driving dangerous climate change.

It’s time for a People’s Intervention.

Stephen Harper has called the Energy East pipeline his “nation building” project, but instead, it’s up to us to turn this into a movement building moment — a chance to unite and build a powerful resistance to tar sands.

Over 4,000 km long, Energy East would  cross 6 provinces, hundreds of towns and cities, thousands of waterways and 180 First Nations communities. The pipeline alone would produce the same amount of carbon each year as 7 million new cars on Canada’s roads and facilitate the expansion of the tar sands to ensure dangerous levels of climate change. And now the National Energy Board is gearing up to review the pipeline with no consideration for the climate impacts of Energy East.

JOIN THE PEOPLE’S INTERVENTION 

If we come together to build a diverse and powerful movement all along this pipeline route and beyond, we can stop this pipeline and push back tar sands expansion.

Key Reports and Resources

Click to view:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Report on the climate impacts of Energy East. An analysis of Energy East’s primary purpose as a tar sands export pipeline. Energy East covers a lot of ground, check out this interactive map of the project put together by Toronto350.